THE REDS AND PINKS OF AUTUMN

I’ve recently spent a whole lot of money on new clothes and boots, the time was right. Thinking back I’ve only ever bothered to buy new clothes with birthday money, this has been the case for several years. My disposable income has been gobbled up on new HI-FI gear and records.

During the pandemic lock down that we’re all experiencing I wasn’t buying many records, or anything for that matter. My bank account balance had never looked so good. It was as if I had become an overnight pimp and was obtaining cash from all angles. It just goes to show that it was vinyl records milking me dry.

It was around this time that I ventured into my dusty old bedroom wardrobe for a jacket that I knew was in there and I wanted to wear that jacket for the first time in years. A rack of crappy clothes where perched on the rail, the hangers were covered in dust. Unworn and unloved for more than a decade. I realised that I’d been wearing, washing, wearing, washing, ironing, washing and wearing the same clothes for years.

OK, time to get out and buy some new clobber. The unloved clothes, mostly jumpers and knitwear were washed and put in a charity bag. Someone may as well have them cheap. After all, several items hadn’t even been worn and were still sporting price and washing instruction tags.

Despite being in my mid fifties I still don’t go for squaresville high street garb, that ain’t my bag. Mail order was the only way. I must have scrutinised every decent online mod and retro shop for new clothes. They had to be inspired by the shapes and designs of the mid sixties. Not hippie gear may I add, the cut had to be sharp and tight. I also needed the odd top for work.

No Fun: Deep within the teenage bedrooms of early ’80s Louisville, Kentucky, a new sound took shape as young bands with an unorthodox songwriting approach emerges from the hardcore scene. Their music became the driving influence of ’90s post-rock and foreshadowed Seattle grunge. On several occasions, these Louisville bands threatened to break out and become the next big thing. But an unwillingness to compromise kept them just below the surface, solidifying their place in music history as true underground originals.

For Fall / Winter 2020, Levi’s Vintage Clothing celebrates the ’80s Louisville music scene – the uncompromising approach of these artists and the legacy they left behind.


Published by Colin Mason

serious collector of 1960s vinyl records and archivist of vintage music magazines

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Beatopolis

The music we loved

WOW & FLUTTER

Weekly Words and Music

YELLOW PAPER SUNS

Focusing on punk, new wave, garage punk and independent records 1977 - 1985

lightspots

1960s Music And Beyond

MOOF

psychedelic music & arts magazine with a penchant for the more obscure

%d bloggers like this: