CONFESSIONS OF A TEENAGE RECORD COLLECTOR

MONEY WAS TIGHT BUT I STILL MANAGED TO BUY SINGLES AND ALBUMS

Part One – the early years

I kept a diary throughout the 1980s and I still have them in my possession, stored away in a box. Every so often I peek inside the pages of these small books and read the contents.

As you can imagine, I’m swept back in time to my teenage years and early twenties when life was without responsibilities and complications. However, things quickly changed at the age of 17 when I left school and got a full-time job, during the Summer of 1982. 

I started buying records with my £3 per week pocket-money sometime in 1979 but before that I had to make do with unwanted singles from the sixties and early seventies from my Uncle Chris and Uncle Alan.

Those cast-off singles included The Beatles, The Searchers, The Kinks and Simon Dupree & the Big Sound. I’ve got no doubt that it was those ’60s records that lit the fuse with my infatuation with ‘old’ music.

I was an avid Radio 1 listener during my youth and would tune into the breakfast show while getting ready and having my breakfast before school. 

I’d also never miss ‘Top of The Pops’ on Thursday evenings. Even though the majority of the acts and groups I saw were abysmal I watched it anyway hoping that one day something would get me engrossed.

The turning point which tweaked my interest in contemporary sounds was after watching an episode of “Marc“, a short-lived music TV programme presented by Marc Bolan.

One of the guest bands were a three-piece called The Jam and I thought they were magnificent. They were fast, loud and seemed arrogant with songs about youth culture and resisting authority. I could definitely identify with these older lads.

But I was still only 12-years-old and my woeful amount of pocket money was spent every week on Panini football stickers, Subbuteo teams and accessories, midget gems and bags of crisps. Buying records would have to wait. 

Leave a Reply